Tree Care During Drought: Highlights from Forum

Tree Care During Drought: Highlights from Forum

Water your trees and don’t overprune them.

Those were two primary takeaways from ‘Tree Care During Drought Forum’ held on Nov 12 in Redlands CAThe forum featured Dave Roger, a consultant urban forester who has worked with several Southern California cities. This includes Claremont CA which this year won a significant award for its program to save drought-stricken trees. The event was sponsored by the Inland Empire Resource Conservation District and the Redlands Sustainability Network.
[Read more…]

How to Plant and Water Native Plants

How to Plant and Water Native Plants

I recently attended a “How to Water and Plant Native Plants” seminar at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden. (There’s another one Dec 17 from 10-11am).  Andrew Chambers, who works with RSABG’s Nursery and Conservation programs, shared what he’s learned from experience and discussions with other native plant experts. He also demonstrated RSABG’s recommended planting technique (see photo gallery below).

You will find native plant nursery websites and experts have instructions that vary some, but here are recommendations (I’ve bolded what I think are most important) and why they’re important. [Read more…]

Lessons Learned on our Waterwise Landscaping (and upcoming native plant sales)

Lessons Learned on our Waterwise Landscaping (and upcoming native plant sales)

Note: RSABG in Claremont CA has a free talk on Dec 17, 10-11am  on “How to Water and Plant Native Plants” 


After a baking hot summer in SoCA and no precipitation, we’ve revisited our previous planting and watering schedule. We’re still happy we went with mostly California native plants, but it’s always good to keep learning – therefore the following ‘Lessons Learned’.

Native Plants Need Some Water

Spurred on by an excellent publication “Watering Native Plants”  by Tree of Life Nursery, we’ve learned the following about this challenging area of growing natives. [Read more…]

Watering Trees During Drought

Watering Trees During Drought

To reach local people a version of this has been published on the Redlands Sustainability Network website

After five years of drought here in Southern California we have a tree crisis – in our city alone (Redlands) we have 1400 dead street and park trees. Some are young, but many are old ones that take decades to replace.

Many have been stressed by the continuing drought in California. In addition, well-meaning people have been removing lawns and changing to low-water landscapes — but their trees are not getting the water they need.

Here are some guidelines on watering your trees & useful resources: [Read more…]

A Special Nature Sanctuary in Central Park

A Special Nature Sanctuary in Central Park

Central Park was my nature haven the year I lived in New York City attending graduate school. It still is when I return for visits.

Now, a bird sanctuary on the southeast corner of Central Park, which has been closed to the public since 1934, is open to a limited number of people each week. I recently traipsed around the area, called Hallett Nature Sanctuary, which is on a bluff above the Pond. The Pond was formed from a swamp in the development of Central Park in the 1850s.

Below are some photos from early June.  And here’s what made it special to me: [Read more…]

Low-water Plants for Summer Heat

Low-water Plants for Summer Heat

As for many in California, the numerous days of 100+ degree heat has been tough on our vegetable garden, roses, fruit trees and well, pretty much everything (including ourselves….)

But we continue to have some plants – mostly California natives or their hybrids – that look good despite little to no water. Being natives, they also provide the best habitat for our local insects, birds and butterflies.

The following should be planted in fall through early winter, [Read more…]

Does this Baby Bird Need Rescue?

Does this Baby Bird Need Rescue?

This is a reprint from the May/June issue of the San Bernardino Valley Audubon Society’s Western Meadowlark – Thank you!

by Ruth Greyraven

Do everything you can to reunite an uninjured baby bird with its parents.

If the chick is a cotton-ball on legs… you have a quail, killdeer, or other precocial species. These tiny fluffballs open their eyes and start running after their parents on Day One after hatching. If needed, move the chick from a dangerous location to a safer nearby location.

IMG_4848If the chick is feathered… with a short tail and short wings, but it is fluttering and hopping around rather than flying, then you have a fledgling of an altricial species. It isn’t injured. It is normal for altricial chicks to pop out of the nest before they are ready to fly. This awkward stage will pass in a few days. The fledgling’s parents are nearby, feeding it regularly. The fledgling needs its parents to teach it the ropes of birdness for weeks or even months to come. Move the chick only when needed to get it to a safer nearby location.

If the chick is extremely naked and its eyes aren’t open… you have a hatchling. It is only a day or two old. After its eyes open and tube-like sheaths (pinfeathers) begin grow- ing on the wings and back, we call it a nestling. In either case, the best resolution is to get the baby back in its nest, if you can find the nest and if the nest is within reach. When a nest has fallen, support the nest appropriately and affix it up as close to its orig- inal location as possible. You can create an artificial nest cup, lined with dry grass, and put it somewhere safe or as close to the real nest as possible. Most birds are great parents, if given a little help.

If there is an obvious injury or no way to reconnect the baby bird with its parents, contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. Some veterinarians or humane societies may be able to help, but only a licensed wildlife rehabili- tator can legally provide long-term care. Reha- bilitators are likely to be unpaid volunteers. Don’t expect that somebody will be available to answer your phone call 24/7 and rush to your home. In most instances, you’ll need to bring the baby bird to the rehabilitator. Some of these groups will take every type of injured or orphaned wildlife. Others have specialties.

If you need to provide short-term care to a baby bird … the internet offers many excellent sites with advice on how to care for various species of birds. Hummingbirds need different care than finches. Crows need different care than pigeons.